Editing Megatsunami

Jump to navigation Jump to search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.

Latest revision Your text
Line 110: Line 110:
 
[[La Palma]] is currently the most volcanically active island in the [[Canary Islands]] [[Archipelago]]. It is likely that several eruptions would be required before failure would occur on Cumbre Vieja.<ref name="Day et al."/><ref name="Ward and Day"/> However, the western half of the volcano has an approximate volume of {{convert|500|km3|cumi}} and an estimated mass of {{convert|1.5|e12MT|ST}}. If it were to catastrophically slide into the ocean, it could generate a wave with an initial height of about {{convert|1000|m}} at the island, and a likely height of around {{convert|50|m|0}} at the [[Caribbean]] and the Eastern [[North America]]n seaboard when it runs ashore eight or more hours later. Tens of millions of lives could be lost in the cities and/or towns of [[St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador|St. John's]],  [[Halifax Regional Municipality|Halifax]], [[Boston]], [[New York City|New York]], [[Baltimore]], [[Washington, D.C.]], [[Miami]], [[Havana]] and the rest of the Eastern Coasts of the United States and Canada, as well as many other cities on the Atlantic coast in Europe, South America and Africa.<ref name="Day et al."/><ref name="Ward and Day" /> The likelihood of this happening is a matter of vigorous debate.<ref name="Pararas-Carayannis">{{harvnb|Pararas-Carayannis|2002}}</ref>
 
[[La Palma]] is currently the most volcanically active island in the [[Canary Islands]] [[Archipelago]]. It is likely that several eruptions would be required before failure would occur on Cumbre Vieja.<ref name="Day et al."/><ref name="Ward and Day"/> However, the western half of the volcano has an approximate volume of {{convert|500|km3|cumi}} and an estimated mass of {{convert|1.5|e12MT|ST}}. If it were to catastrophically slide into the ocean, it could generate a wave with an initial height of about {{convert|1000|m}} at the island, and a likely height of around {{convert|50|m|0}} at the [[Caribbean]] and the Eastern [[North America]]n seaboard when it runs ashore eight or more hours later. Tens of millions of lives could be lost in the cities and/or towns of [[St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador|St. John's]],  [[Halifax Regional Municipality|Halifax]], [[Boston]], [[New York City|New York]], [[Baltimore]], [[Washington, D.C.]], [[Miami]], [[Havana]] and the rest of the Eastern Coasts of the United States and Canada, as well as many other cities on the Atlantic coast in Europe, South America and Africa.<ref name="Day et al."/><ref name="Ward and Day" /> The likelihood of this happening is a matter of vigorous debate.<ref name="Pararas-Carayannis">{{harvnb|Pararas-Carayannis|2002}}</ref>
  
The last eruption on the [[Cumbre Vieja]] occurred in 1971 at the Teneguia vent at the southern end of the [[subaerial|sub-aerial]] section without any movement. The section affected by the 1949 eruption is currently stationary and does not appear to have moved since the initial rupture.<ref>As per Bonelli Rubio</ref>
+
The last eruption on the Cumbre Vieja occurred in 1971 at the Teneguia vent at the southern end of the [[subaerial|sub-aerial]] section without any movement. The section affected by the 1949 eruption is currently stationary and does not appear to have moved since the initial rupture.<ref>As per Bonelli Rubio</ref>
  
 
Geologists and [[Volcanology|volcanologist]]s are in general agreement that the initial study was flawed. The current geology does not suggest that a collapse is imminent. Indeed, it seems to be geologically impossible right now, the region conjectured as prone to collapse is too small and too stable to collapse within the next 10,000 years.<ref name=MegatsunamiStudyFlawed>[https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060920192823.htm New Research Puts 'Killer La Palma Tsunami' At Distant Future], Science Daily, September 21, 2006, based on materials from the Delft University of Technology</ref> They also concluded that a landslide is likely to happen as a series of smaller collapses rather than a single landslide from closer study of deposits left in the ocean by previous landslides.  A megatsunami does seem possible locally in the distant future as there is geological evidence from past deposits suggesting that a megatsunami occurred with marine material deposited  41 to 188 meters above sea level between 32,000 and 1.75 million years ago.<ref name=PastCanaryIslesMegatsunami>Pérez-Torrado, F. J; Paris, R; Cabrera, M. C; Schneider, J-L; Wassmer, P; Carracedo, J. C; Rodríguez-Santana, A; & Santana, F; 2006. [https://scholar.google.com/scholar_url?url=http://www.academia.edu/download/46082254/j.margeo.2005.11.00820160530-19206-1rdt4r3.pdf&hl=en&sa=T&oi=gsb-gga&ct=res&cd=0&d=8226638742047341218&ei=lXU2W4XnOcqUmgHQv7QI&scisig=AAGBfm35w-vFbGatfP2kAiTY9LGqIpSZsw Tsunami deposits related to flank collapse in oceanic volcanoes: The Agaete Valley evidence, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands]. Marine Geol. 227, 135–149</ref> This seems to have been local to Gran Canaria. Deposits on  the north-western slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands suggest a megatsunami 179,000 years ago with a height of {{convert|132|m|ft}}<ref name=Paris2017>Paris, R., Bravo, J.J.C., González, M.E.M., Kelfoun, K. and Nauret, F., 2017. [https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15246 Explosive eruption, flank collapse and megatsunami at Tenerife ca. 170 ka]. Nature communications, 8, p.15246.</ref>
 
Geologists and [[Volcanology|volcanologist]]s are in general agreement that the initial study was flawed. The current geology does not suggest that a collapse is imminent. Indeed, it seems to be geologically impossible right now, the region conjectured as prone to collapse is too small and too stable to collapse within the next 10,000 years.<ref name=MegatsunamiStudyFlawed>[https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060920192823.htm New Research Puts 'Killer La Palma Tsunami' At Distant Future], Science Daily, September 21, 2006, based on materials from the Delft University of Technology</ref> They also concluded that a landslide is likely to happen as a series of smaller collapses rather than a single landslide from closer study of deposits left in the ocean by previous landslides.  A megatsunami does seem possible locally in the distant future as there is geological evidence from past deposits suggesting that a megatsunami occurred with marine material deposited  41 to 188 meters above sea level between 32,000 and 1.75 million years ago.<ref name=PastCanaryIslesMegatsunami>Pérez-Torrado, F. J; Paris, R; Cabrera, M. C; Schneider, J-L; Wassmer, P; Carracedo, J. C; Rodríguez-Santana, A; & Santana, F; 2006. [https://scholar.google.com/scholar_url?url=http://www.academia.edu/download/46082254/j.margeo.2005.11.00820160530-19206-1rdt4r3.pdf&hl=en&sa=T&oi=gsb-gga&ct=res&cd=0&d=8226638742047341218&ei=lXU2W4XnOcqUmgHQv7QI&scisig=AAGBfm35w-vFbGatfP2kAiTY9LGqIpSZsw Tsunami deposits related to flank collapse in oceanic volcanoes: The Agaete Valley evidence, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands]. Marine Geol. 227, 135–149</ref> This seems to have been local to Gran Canaria. Deposits on  the north-western slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands suggest a megatsunami 179,000 years ago with a height of {{convert|132|m|ft}}<ref name=Paris2017>Paris, R., Bravo, J.J.C., González, M.E.M., Kelfoun, K. and Nauret, F., 2017. [https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15246 Explosive eruption, flank collapse and megatsunami at Tenerife ca. 170 ka]. Nature communications, 8, p.15246.</ref>

Please note that all contributions to Doomsday debunked are considered to be released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) (see Doomsday debunked:Copyrights for details). If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly and redistributed at will, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource. Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)