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However, other research suggests that such a single large landslide is not likely at present. Collapses do occur but the geology only favours a series of smaller landslides.
 
However, other research suggests that such a single large landslide is not likely at present. Collapses do occur but the geology only favours a series of smaller landslides.
  
The detailed review by George Pararas-Carayannis concludes:<ref name=Pararas>{{cite web |url=https://www.researchgate.net/publication/38112179_Evaluation_of_the_threat_of_mega_tsunami_generation_from_postulated_massive_slope_failures_of_island_stratovolcanoes_on_La_Palma_Canary_Islands_and_on_the_Island_of_Hawaii |title=Evaluation of the threat of mega tsunami generation from postulated massive slope failures of island volcanoes on La Palma, Canary Islands, and on the island of Hawaii|last=Pararas-Carayannis |first=George |year=2002 |publisher=drgeorgepc.com |accessdate=2008-12-20}}</ref>
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The detailed review by George Pararas-Carayannis concludes:<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.researchgate.net/profile/George_Pararas-Carayannis/publication/38112179_Evaluation_of_the_threat_of_mega_tsunami_generation_from_postulated_massive_slope_failures_of_island_stratovolcanoes_on_La_Palma_Canary_Islands_and_on_the_Island_of_Hawaii/links/00b49531a6be223546000000.pdf |title=Evaluation of the threat of mega tsunami generation from postulated massive slope failures of island volcanoes on La Palma, Canary Islands, and on the island of Hawaii|last=Pararas-Carayannis |first=George |year=2002 |publisher=drgeorgepc.com |accessdate=2008-12-20}}</ref>
 
{{quote|A similar review of the geology and of historic events of the island of Hawaii, does not indicate that  Kilauea's southern flank is unusually unstable or that a massive collapse is possible in the foreseeable future.  None of the strong earthquakes in Hilo in 1834,  in Mauna Loa in 1938, or along the Kona coast in 1951, triggered an underwater slope failure or generated a tsunami.  Neither of the 1868 or the 1975 major earthquakes on the southern coast of Hawaii resulted in major flank collapses.  The slope failures were large but not massive. Other than local destructive  tsunamis, these two events did not generate destructive  waves  at great distances away from the source region.  The  1975 tsunami did cause  limited damage to boats on Catalina island, near the California coast, but no waves of significance occurred there or anywhere else.
 
{{quote|A similar review of the geology and of historic events of the island of Hawaii, does not indicate that  Kilauea's southern flank is unusually unstable or that a massive collapse is possible in the foreseeable future.  None of the strong earthquakes in Hilo in 1834,  in Mauna Loa in 1938, or along the Kona coast in 1951, triggered an underwater slope failure or generated a tsunami.  Neither of the 1868 or the 1975 major earthquakes on the southern coast of Hawaii resulted in major flank collapses.  The slope failures were large but not massive. Other than local destructive  tsunamis, these two events did not generate destructive  waves  at great distances away from the source region.  The  1975 tsunami did cause  limited damage to boats on Catalina island, near the California coast, but no waves of significance occurred there or anywhere else.
  
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| postscript = <!-- Bot inserted parameter. Either remove it; or change its value to "." for the cite to end in a ".", as necessary. -->{{inconsistent citations}}}}</ref>
 
| postscript = <!-- Bot inserted parameter. Either remove it; or change its value to "." for the cite to end in a ".", as necessary. -->{{inconsistent citations}}}}</ref>
  
However the geological conditions that lead to these are no longer present.<ref name=Pararas/>
 
{{quote|The massive, prehistoric, collapse of the Monte Amarelo volcano on Fogo, in  the Cape Verde island group, appears to have been induced by radial rift zones fed by laterally propagating dikes (Day et al 1999b).  More recent eruption on Fogo, in  1951 and 1995,  appear to be associated with episodes of flank instability caused by now vertically propagating dikes which manifested in normal faulting near the volcano's rift zone}}
 
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==
 
* [[2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami]]
 
* [[2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami]]

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